Dana Mahr

Dana Mahr

postdoc

         

PhD Bielefeld University (2013)

Research interests

Dana Mahr is a postdoctoral researcher within the ERC/SNF research group “Rethinking Public Participation and Science” at the University of Geneva. Her research centers on sociology and history of public participation in science, technology and medicine from different perspectives. In 2014 she published her PhD thesis “Citizen Science: Participatory Knowledge Production in the late 19th and early 20th Century” (In German). In addition, Dana Mahr explores the history and sociology of the co-production of knowledge between patients, families, medical professionals and scientists within emerging biomedical practices like whole genome sequencing. In Geneva she works on discovering “longue durée” relations between social movements and participatory health research. Furthermore she is representative of the Swiss Confederation within COST Action “Citizen Science to promote creativity, scientific literacy, and innovation throughout Europe”.

   CV 2016 August

Publications

Mahr D, Mahr E, and Rehmann-Sutter C, (forthcoming), Searching for meaning in genes.
Two types of sense-making towards ‘genetic’ factors in narratives of people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases who want to have children (in German). (planned submission to ZfS).

Mahr D, (forthcoming), Narrating Genes. How patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases interpret a emerging disease etiology and how we can make sense out of it by developing a historically and sociologically informed framework, in: Heike Petermann et al. (eds): A history of human genetics, Munich: Springer.

Mahr D, Goebel C, Irwin A, Vohland K, (forthcoming), Citizen Science Studies. How to co-produce reflexiveness and productive dialogue between citizen science practitioners and researchers, in: Aletta Bonn et al. (eds.): Citizen Science – Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy, London: UCL Press.

Pettibone L, Mahr D, Schroegel P, et al., (forthcoming), Mimicking science or empowering critical actors? The central role of participation in citizen science (submitted as a discussion paper to S&TS).

Mahr D, Dickel S, (forthcoming), Citizen Science beyond invited participation (submitted to ST&HM).

Mahr D, Pruell L, (forthcoming), The speculum of wonder women. The long lasting decolonization of women’s bodies in the 1970s and today (in German), in: Paul Buckermann et al. (eds.): Systematische Un/Ordnung. Zum Verhaeltnis von digitaler Technologie und gesellschaftlicher Emanzipation, Muenster: Unrast Verlag.

Mahr D, (forthcoming) Microbiomic empowerment? Are DIY fecal transplants a way for more self-efficacy for patients who suffer of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases? (in German), in: Sascha Dickel et al. (eds.): Personal Health Science, Munich: Springer. (PDF).

Mahr D, (2016) Alienation, disenchantment, and a insufficient concept of the public. Some thoughts about the sociological background of the recent participatory turn in science and society (in German), OEAD.News 101/2016, pp. 18-20. (PDF).

Rehmann-Sutter C and Mahr D, (2016), The lived genome, in: Anne Whitehead et al. (eds.): Edinburgh Companion to the Critical Medical Humanities, Edinburgh: Edinburgh Univ. Press, pp. 87-103. (PDF)

Mahr D, (2015), History and epistemology of the actors perspective. Relapse or progress in the participation of amateurs? (in German) in: Peter Finke (ed.): Citizen Science: Farewell to the Ivory Tower?, Munich, Oekom, pp. 107-111. (PDF)

Mahr D, and Rehmann-Sutter C (2015), Information and participation. Commentary on ‚Project EURAT. Ethical and Legal Aspects of Whole Human Genome Sequencing‘ (in German) in: Martin Langanke, Sabine Rudnik-Schöneborn et al. (eds.): Incidental Findings and Whole Genome Studies. Ethical, Legal and Medical Challenges, Munich, Springer Medicine, pp. 119-129. (PDF)

Wilhelm N, Mahr D, and Rehmann-Sutter C, (2015), Ileostomy as a turning point? (in German), in: Bauchredner 1/15, pp. 1-8. (PDF)

Vohland K, Dickel S, Ziegler D, Mahr D, (2015),  Virtual citizen science. Digital approaches in citizen science projects, Citizens create knowledge – Knowledge creates citizenship (GEWISS) (in German), Report no. 2: Museum of Babel. (PDF)

Heitholt U and Mahr D,  (2014), Free creatures or caged animals? Spatial concepts of bird life in the context of the ‘Bürgertum’ in the 19th century (in German), Animal Studies 06/2014, pp. 97-107 (PDF)

Mahr D, (2014), Citizen science: Participatory knowledge production in the late 19th and early 20th Century (PhD thesis Bielefeld University; in German), Science and Technology Studies 12, Baden-Baden: Nomos. (LINK)